see2think

thinking with pictures


Leave a comment

Palimpsest – time traveler

palimsest2018jan3aberdeen-street

Utility pole, probably Sitka Spruce, maybe harvested a generation or two ago & still holding announcements attached by staple, brad, pin or nail (January 2018).

Palimpsest is a rare old word that means the beeswax tablets encased in a wood frame and accompanied by a stylus with which a young scholar was able to do math problems or practice one’s hand at penmanship. After each use the wax would be smoothed over to provide a clean start for the next piece of work. But hints of the earlier traces sometimes carried through. So in the modern use of the word, it means a place or time that bears traces of earlier uses.

This photo was taken at eye level and shows the location on the wood pole that is most likely to attract attention from pedestrians, or people passing by in cars who stop briefly at the intersection where a 4-way stop sign scheme forces everybody to pause momentarily. Over the years one or more fasteners (what attaches the paper or plastic message or announcement to the wood) were used and nearly always left behind. The paper or plastic containing news of a lost pet, a yard sale or community event, ballot initiative, or some other informational notice would either be removed by the person who posted it, or by someone else wishing to use the space and finding the old material out of date and ready to be removed. Other times the natural force of wind, rain, freezing-thawing cycles, and the power of sunlight to fade the ink and weaken the material resulted in the message parting from the fasteners holding it in place. So this graveyard of staples, nails, tacks and pushpins, tape, and brads shows the many seasons of communications at this corner. It is a kind of palimpsest of the years gone by.

Expanding on this idea it is possible to see the world not just for what it presents at the moment of observation, but also to consider the frame of view as containing the accumulated traces of past activity, lives, dreams, intentions, and reactions. In other words, when you accept the idea of palimpsest then your vision expands beyond the present and seeks out signs of other times – things from before that have been repurposed and integrated to the modern day uses, or things fragmented and left by the wayside, unnoticed or uncared for by today’s habits and residents. To fast forward the scene and identify the seeds of future developments is a bit more speculative and stretches the imagination more than the look backwards in time requires, but there, too, it is a kind of palimpsest. In this way the 1993 quote attributed to Sci-Fi author, William Gibson, fits in: “The future is already here — it’s just not very evenly distributed.”

source, https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/William_Gibson

Advertisements


Leave a comment

Reading the cityscape, reading the social’scape

photo of public tour of castle excavation, Echizen City, Japan

Edo-period Lord Honda’s castle moat under the 1950 city hall parking lot (Echizen city, Japan 22 July 2017).

The photo shows buildings from many generations all within the frame, starting with the current deposition layer exposed in the multi-year excavation at city center in Echizen-shi, Japan, and then the traditional tile roof of the private residence at the right, as well as the steel I-beam white faced multi-story building containing retail at street level and residential space above. By walking or biking the old grid of narrow streets of this very old city, it is possible to see generations of buildings. Apart from temples, most buildings range from the 1880s to the present, since fires (from the days before gas to cook and heat with) periodically destroyed sections of the town historically, and the custom of rebuilding every 50 or 75 years to freshen things up, rather than merely to remodel also reduces the oldest physical traces around the city.

With more and more walking and viewing experience, small details and reminders of earlier worldviews, values, motivations and cultural assumptions appear at unexpected moments or in the fertile imagination that comes in the twilight of dawn and around dusk. A local historian is likely to be less free in picturing what might have stood at a certain location and time, and the activities one might expect to see there at certain seasons or calendar dates, and even much less be willing to stretch the imagination to visualize what sorts of lives, habits, aspirations and burdens the people of a given place and time lived. But for someone trained in social science with a hobby interest in genealogy, tracing these connections of long ago to the point we have come to now is entirely possible, conjecture though it may all be.

And so, to set forth with camera in hand, looking for clues to what once happened here, or even to know what the meaning and activity of a location is nowadays, is a rewarding sort of visual exercise. Much like hunters who pick up small signs of the life they are tracking, or the way that a detective seizes on clues that together form inductive reasoning and from there extending to deductive reasoning, so also can a person walk the streets and bike the fields and read the terrain for clues to meaning, changes from then that still exist now, and possibly portend things to come – a nod to science-fiction writer William Gibson who is attributed with – “the future is already here; it is just distributed unevenly” (some instances are easy to see, but in other settings maybe there is less to recognize as belonging to future generations).